Ticketing 5 Km’s over the Speed Limit

March 20, 2011

Quoted in the paper..
” A move to lower the road toll by getting tougher on speeding drivers at Christmas netted almost $1 million in fines.
Between 4pm on Christmas Eve and 6am on January 5, police took action against drivers going more than 5km/h over the limit, instead of the usual 10km/h.
Figures obtained by the Herald on Sunday under the Official Information Act reveal 31,786 drivers paid $953,580 as a result. Almost half were driving up to 60km/h in a 50km/h zone.
The road tolls over Christmas and Labour weekend – when a similar operation took place – were the same as the previous year.
A similar operation last Queen’s Birthday Weekend coincided with a big fall in the toll – from eight to one – compared with the year before.
Reaction to the $1m haul has been divided. Police defend their lower tolerance of speeding drivers but motorists question why the campaign wasn’t restricted to highways and dismissed the move as a revenue-gathering exercise.
National road policing manager Paula Rose said reducing speed was the most important factor in road safety. “In 2008, speed contributed to 34 per cent of New Zealand’s fatal crashes and 20 per cent of serious injury crashes,” she said.”

I have to challenge the notion that 5-10kms or even 20 kms over the limit on 100 km/hour roads will lead to a statistic increase in the road toll.
Much of the excess speeds are conducted in safe conditions such as open stretches of highway with little or no traffic.
A speeding driver is more often noticed as overtaking a car doing the legal limit or rapidly approaching the rear of a car doing the legal limit, usually there is a tail gating incident as the speeding driver fails to anticipate their closing speed and distance.

The Police avoid discussing the road toll statistics that spike upwards after their prolonged media and road Policing campaigns, as this does not fit their road toll lowering theories versus getting tough on minor speeding incidences.

Everyone knows, but these highway men in blue, that half witted, drunk and wasted morons who plant foot and crash at speeds wildly in excess of 20 kms over the limit are the direct cause of speeding related road toll statistics.
The road toll after this group are taken out, are: failing to keep left, failing to give way, fatigue and falling asleep, rubber necking, or just plain incompetent behind the wheel.
There are also medical causes, such as passing out or dying behind the wheel.

It’s high time some sensible politicians reined these wanker cops in and take a hard look at the state of some NZ highways and the general level of competence of drivers being granted their licences.

I am in favour of day driving led lights as an aid to collision avoidance.
The present theory by transport officials and the vehicle lighting industry is 400 lumen 4 watt led lamps times 2 units fitted and switched off automatically for main headlight operation.

I disagree, having trialed a 1.8 watt led strip. The strip led is being noticed and I am experiencing much lower failure to give way . The light output is measured at 25 lumen, the light is not so bright as to warrant automatic switching off when the main headlights are being deployed.